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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Exercise and Health > Longitudinal preventive-screening cutoffs for metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/104802
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Title: Longitudinal preventive-screening cutoffs for metabolic syndrome in adolescents.
Authors: Flouris, Andreas D.
Bouziotas, Constantin
Christodoulos, A. D.
Koutedakis, Yiannis
Citation: International journal of obesity, 32(10): 1506-12
Publisher: Macmillan
Journal: International journal of obesity
Issue Date: Oct-2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/104802
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/104791
DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2008.142
PubMed ID: 18698315
Additional Links: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&hid=109&sid=f33b99a0-3c98-470e-991a-d2d07e9fcd20%40sessionmgr113
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To detect metabolic risk factor cutoff points in adolescence for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome that develops at the age of 17 years (MS17). DESIGN: This study adopted a 6-year design incorporating four data collection time points (TPs). Volunteers were assessed prospectively at the ages of 12, 13, 14 and 17. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 210, 204, 198 and 187 schoolchildren volunteered at the first (TP(1)=12 years old), second (TP2=13 years old), third (TP3=14 years old) and fourth (TP4=17 years old) data collection TP, respectively. MEASUREMENTS: At each data collection TP, anthropometrical, biological and lifestyle data were obtained. Identical protocols were used for each assessment conducted by the same trained investigators. RESULTS: A total of 12% of the participants were diagnosed with MS17, the majority of them being boys (P<0.05). The prevalence of the syndrome increased directly with the degree of obesity. Using body mass index (BMI), adiposity and/or aerobic fitness levels in both genders, MS17 could be correctly diagnosed as early as TP1. No such cutoff points were found for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels. CONCLUSION: With respect to the data presented, it has been established that the calculated longitudinal preventive-screening cutoffs allow successful diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in adolescents using BMI, adiposity or aerobic fitness levels in both sexes. Adoption of such pediatric guidelines may help mitigate future increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Adiposity
Aerobic fitness
Prevention
Adolescence
ROC curve
Screening
MeSH: Adiposity
Adolescent
Blood Pressure
Body Mass Index
Child
Energy Intake
Exercise
Female
Humans
Lipoproteins
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X
Obesity
Physical Fitness
Risk Factors
Sexual Maturation
ISSN: 1476-5497
Appears in Collections: Exercise and Health
Exercise and Health

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